Facebook: The 100 Billion Dollar Monstrosity

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A few days ago, I was sitting with a few friends at our local hangout, waiting for our order. The small TV was showing a special news report on sun signs, and why it was essential for people born under the sign of Sagittarius to eat 2-3 spoonfuls of sugar that day. When slowly, our conversation drifted towards Facebook and it’s IPO (initial public offering) plans.

A: Dude! This is some serious shit. Facebook has grown at an unfathomable rate. A $100 billion is something.

B: And now that they are going public with about 10% of their shares, they hope to raise about $5 billions initially and then go for more, leaving the older boys like Google and Yahoo far behind

C: It is an amazing success story. And to think that Mark Zuckerberg only started it less than a decade ago.

B: Yeah! And to think that it has done all this despite having the most bull-crap business idea ever.

A: You have not said anything, SL. Quite unlike you.

Me: Yahoo is still alive?

…………………………….As Facebook launches it’s IPO in a bid to become the largest internet company, one can’t help but question the frivolousness that has boosted it to this level……………….…………………….Wrote this article for Campusghanta. Do click on the link, please, to read the complete postFacebook: The 100 Billion Behemoth

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9 Responses to “Facebook: The 100 Billion Dollar Monstrosity”
  1. Purba says:

    Applause for this post – it was taut and sprinkled with your trademark wry humour.

    But facebook is just a tool – isn’t it up to us how we use it? Does everybody while away their time on this site? I am aware most of us use social networking to posture ourselves – look how wise, smart, funny I am. We brag, expect applause for our little achievements, share vacation/party pics, use it to network. To each his own! Who are we to say you are wasting your time!

    And if FB dies like Orkut, do you think the world will become a better place?

    • snowleopard says:

      Thank you for the appreciation. Means a lot.
      In a way, yes, I agree, Facebook is a tool. And so are all social networking sites. But don’t you think that for a site that is merely an overhyped forum, it has gained much more than what sites like Wikipedia and Google. But then what can I say. We live in a world where a movie like “The Girl in Yellow Boots” fetches a fraction of the revenue generated by “Bodyguard”
      Social networking sites gives people freedom, and many can’t seem to handle that freedom.
      By the by, Orkut is still alive.

  2. Dark Knight says:

    I agree with Purba. FB is just a tool, and a free one at that. You don’t HAVE to use it unless you want to. And you can use it as little or as much as you want. Just make sure not to badmouth your current employer or play games like Castleville during work hours! :-P

    • snowleopard says:

      But we tend to misuse things, rather than use them.

      • Dark Knight says:

        True… but the fault lies with the misuser, not in the idea itself. Just the other day one woman got murdured by a psycopath guy for “un-friending” him on FB. But you can’t blame FB for that. The guy is a psychopath regardless — he would’ve killed her even if she “un-friended” him over the phone.

  3. Pzes says:

    Dig at Sahaayyyy… come on!

  4. Isn’t it amazing what an idea can become! I wonder why doesn’t the government maintain data the way facebook does, easy to find, readily available and with control on who sees how much.

    Here’s what I wrote on Campusghanta, after reading your post…
    Well written, I agree I guess…
    Perhaps it also depends on how one uses it? It’s also a great way to find and stay in touch with anybody else with an account… I guess those who are addicted to facebook today are those who would have been glued to their cell phones and TVs otherwise.

    • snowleopard says:

      Like I said in a comment above. We usually tend to misuse things, rather than use them. Facebook is a platform, a glorified forum if you will. Maybe it is our insecurity that makes us cling to virtual appreciation.

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